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Frequently Asked Questions

For patients

What is an Outpatient Virtual Visit?

Telemedicine uses a videoconferencing platform, much like Skype, to connect providers with patients in different locations for a virtual medical visit.

How does it work?

You can attend an Outpatient Virtual Visit with a Dartmouth-Hitchcock physician or provider in a couple of ways:

  • From your home or office using a smart phone, tablet, laptop or computer
  • From your local clinic

Am I still able to see my clinician in person if I start using virtual visits?

Yes, absolutely! You and your provider can discuss the frequency and appropriate use for virtual visits.

Does my health insurance cover telemedicine virtual visits?

Yes, in many circumstances. As for any medical service, if you are unsure about your telemedicine coverage benefit, please call your insurance company for more information.

Will I still be billed if there are technical challenges?

If any challenges arise which result in an unsuccessful two-way audio/visual connection, you will not be charged for the visit.

What do I need in order to participate?

If you go to your local clinic for the visit, you will not need anything more than what is usually expected of you (for example, an up-to-date medication list). If you have your virtual visit in a non-clinical location, like your home, you will need access to Wi-Fi or a strong cell signal, and a device that has a camera, speaker and microphone.

Is the virtual visit connection secure and private?

Yes! The platform and software used are 100% privacy compliant.

Is it recorded?

No, your virtual visits will never be recorded.

If I'm interested in having a virtual visit, where do I start?

If you're interested in having an outpatient virtual visit, talk to your doctor to find out if they offer this service.


For D-HH clinicians

What is an outpatient virtual visit?

Telemedicine uses a videoconferencing platform, much like Skype, to connect providers with patients in different locations for a virtual medical visit.

Do patients like telemedicine?

Patients love the option to use telemedicine. In fact, multiple surveys indicate that health care consumers are willing and eager to receive care via telemedicine, especially if it means greater convenience and cost savings. Telemedicine allows your patients to see reduced travel time, access to specialty care not available locally, and fewer absences from work/school.

What does it take to get set up to do telemedicine?

The Center for TeleHealth will take you through the process, from A-to-Z. We'll start by scheduling an intake with you to find out more about your current clinical offerings and how you'd like to use telemedicine. We'll then assemble a project team and work with them to get the service up and running. We have a fine-tuned process that ensures all boxes are checked prior to going live with a service, and we provide additional monitoring and support after the service is live.

How does billing work?

The telemedicine visit types apply the necessary modifiers in the background, so you can continue to use your usual CPT codes.

Will my RVUs be affected?

No. You will receive the same RVUs that you would if doing the same amount of work in your clinic.

Where do I document the note and encounter?

You will document and complete your encounter the same way you do for in-person visits.

What sort of technology will I need?

Some clinicians prefer to use just their laptops, while others prefer a docking station and dual monitors. Headsets and external cameras are often used and are relatively inexpensive. If you are concerned about your workspace or current technical setup, you can use the TeleHealth Provider Room located in Connected Care, which has a complete setup, including laptop.

How long does it take to set up a telemedicine service?

Depending on where the service is being offered to, it can take as little as 2-4 weeks, or up to several months. Some factors that impact the length of the implementation are contracting, privileging and licensing (if looking to offer to a state that you are not currently licensed in). Home-based services are the fastest to get up and running, as they do not require the participation of another site.

Do I need to be licensed in the state that the patient is in at the time of the visit?

Yes, but this varies by discipline. For MDs, APRNs and PAs, you must be licensed in the state that the patient is physically located in at the time of the visit. RNs, therapists and other disciplines vary. We will advise licensure requirements for your service at intake.

Our clinic is interested in setting up a telemedicine service; who do we contact?

Katie Darling, Sr. Practice Manager
Katelyn.A.Darling@hitchcock.org
(603) 650-1317


For originating sites (patient locations)

What sort of technology is needed on our side?

Equipment will vary depending on the clinical specialty or needs of a particular patient population. Some virtual visits can be conducted via video connection to a PC or tablet on the patient side. A more in-depth appointment may require the use of a telemedicine cart, which is a sophisticated "all-in-one" unit that includes:

  • Monitor
  • Computer
  • Camera
  • Peripheral devices - Bluetooth-enabled peripheral instruments that may be used to assist in an interactive examination include: hand-held camera, otoscope and a digital stethoscope

How does the billing and documentation work?

Visit documentation and professional billing is completed by the specialist in the D-H EMR. A nominal originating site facility fee may be collected by the site.

Who schedules and corresponds with the patient?

Appointments are made by the D-H scheduler, who confirms the appointment details with the patient and sends them an appointment letter. The site will often perform reminder calling to the patients several days prior to the appointment, per their usual protocol.

What if the patient ends up needing ancillary testing? Will that be done with our facility or at D-H? Who will arrange that?

If the patient chooses to have their ancillary testing completed at your facility, the order can be obtained by your staff via D- H Connect (a read-only version of the D-H EMR that you can print from) and will be arranged by you (including obtaining a prior authorization, when necessary). If the patient chooses to have their testing done at D-H (or it is recommended to them by the specialist to do so), the D-H staff will make these arrangements.

How long does it take to set up a telemedicine service?

Depending on turnaround time for things like contracting and privileging, it can take anywhere from 45-90 days to implement an outpatient telemedicine service.

Our clinic is interested in setting up a telemedicine service; who do we contact?

Katie Darling, Sr. Practice Manager
Katelyn.A.Darling@hitchcock.org
(603) 650-1317

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